Hookup, Find Sex or Meet Someone Hot Now

When the police lie  

rick315875 62M
12096 posts
6/8/2020 5:17 am

Last Read:
6/9/2020 5:23 am

When the police lie

Martin Gugino, a 75-year-old protester, lays on the ground after he was shoved by two police officers in Buffalo, New York.

An encounter in Buffalo last Thursday — in which two police officers shoved a 75-year-old man to the ground and left lying him there while blood poured out of his ear — was troubling partly because of the original police account.

The account claimed that the man “was injured when he tripped and fell.” If a video hadn’t existed, the truth might never have come out.

That’s a widespread problem:

In Philadelphia last week, the police said that a man had pushed an officer off his bike; a video instead showed an officer striking the man with a baton.

In a suburb of Sacramento in April, a police officer punched a 14-year-old boy multiple times while arresting him; the officer’s report didn’t mention the punches.

The Minneapolis police’s account of George Floyd’s death initially left out the most important details, like the knee pressed on his neck for almost nine minutes.

Philip Stinson, a criminologist at Bowling Green State University, who has analyzed thousands of police reports, told CNN that lies like these were fairly common.

Activists in the current protest movement have begun to focus on how they can turn the rallies of the past 10 days into lasting change, to reduce both racism and police brutality. And reducing the frequency of false reports by the police is likely to be a key issue.

Already, reform-minded prosecutors and police chiefs have taken some steps in the last few years. The top prosecutor in St. Louis, Kim Gardner, has stopped accepting new cases or search warrant requests from officers with a history of misconduct or lies. In Philadelphia and Seattle, prosecutors are creating similar “do not call” lists, The Marshall Project has reported.

Chris Magnus, the police chief in Tucson, Ariz., told the Marshall Project: “If I had my way, officers who lie wouldn’t just be put on a list, they’d be fired, and also not allowed to work in any other jurisdiction as a police officer ever again.” Often, though, police-union contracts prevent firing even officers with a record of brutality and dishonesty — which then casts a shadow over the many police officers who tell the truth.

(The Times published an investigation this weekend, explaining how police unions have amassed political power and blocked change.)

False police reports are not a new problem. What’s new are the videos that have caused people to realize how common they are. “When I was a reporter, it was the police officer’s word against the victim’s or suspect’s,” Jamie Stockwell, a deputy national editor at The Times, told me. “Cellphone video has changed the debate over policing.”

Source: The New York Times




rick315875 62M
10351 posts
6/9/2020 5:23 am

    Quoting pocogato12:
    What blew me away after they pushed Martin down was the following officers did nothing except one who tried to ush the others away but he is not fimed helping the man so??? what's missing
What's a missing is accountability. There is a culture within law enforcement of See No Evil Hear No Evil speak no evil


rick315875 62M
10351 posts
6/9/2020 4:59 am

    Quoting Tmptrzz:
    You know I watched those two policeman push Martin Gugino, hubby and I were both so upset when we were watching this. Not to mention all the numerous other altercations against the protesters this past week. I hope those Buffalo Policeman are terminated, this is not the way police are supposed to act.

    There are a lot of good cops out there, and some are giving them all a bad name, its truly sad..
Yes but do these so-called good cops turn a blind eye to what they know and see from fellow officers? Is there a culture among law enforcement to say nothing and do nothing to stop it?


rick315875 62M
10351 posts
6/9/2020 4:53 am

    Quoting Bettibenobo:
    What I don't understand is why there are cops that are still brutalizing people when they know just about EVERYBODY has a cell phone with a camera.

    And nobody is afraid to whip it out and start filming. And when the cops being filmed try to stop somebody from doing so someone else is catching THAT too.

    I'm surprised there weren't more people that caught George's murder on video.

    I see the head of the police union who claims the cops didn't get due process has been asked to resign.

    I think it's funny (sic) that 57 cops in Buffalo resigned ONLY from the special unit, in support of the thugs but didn't actually quit the police department.
    The thugs who, after they knocked down a 75 year old man, (in chemo fighting cancer) j walked right by him, shaking their head like he was a piece of garbage - you know like how they treat most black people. You can see when he lost consciousness when his cell phone fell out of his hand and blood was forming a pool under his head.
Thank you for your comment. I appreciate you sharing your thoughts on the matter. There is a culture of police brutality and fellow officers turning a blind eye and allowing this disgusting behavior to continue.


rick315875 62M
10351 posts
6/9/2020 4:44 am

    Quoting AnewWoman:
    You need to be careful not to paint all cops with the same brush. Yes there are too many cases of bad cops as you pointed out, but let's not let the few bad ones discredit those who are respectful and there to serve and protect the public. Yes the bad ones need to be pointed out and dealt with to discourage others from crossing the line. We want cops to be respectful of those they encounter, maybe a good place to start would be by reciprocating being respectful of the police.
I can understand your sentiment but the problem of police brutality exists because no one does anything about it. Fellow police officers do nothing to stop it. So they are just as guilty.


pocogato12 68F  
33720 posts
6/8/2020 1:53 pm

What blew me away after they pushed Martin down was the following officers did nothing except one who tried to ush the others away but he is not fimed helping the man so??? what's missing

(Virtual Symposium Group) use Virtual Symposium Group


Tmptrzz 57F
81704 posts
6/8/2020 12:58 pm

You know I watched those two policeman push Martin Gugino, hubby and I were both so upset when we were watching this. Not to mention all the numerous other altercations against the protesters this past week. I hope those Buffalo Policeman are terminated, this is not the way police are supposed to act.

There are a lot of good cops out there, and some are giving them all a bad name, its truly sad..

Just your average every day run of the mill nana here!!!


Bettibenobo 64F  
397 posts
6/8/2020 11:49 am

What I don't understand is why there are cops that are still brutalizing people when they know just about EVERYBODY has a cell phone with a camera.

And nobody is afraid to whip it out and start filming. And when the cops being filmed try to stop somebody from doing so someone else is catching THAT too.

I'm surprised there weren't more people that caught George's murder on video.

I see the head of the police union who claims the cops didn't get due process has been asked to resign.

I think it's funny (sic) that 57 cops in Buffalo resigned ONLY from the special unit, in support of the thugs but didn't actually quit the police department.
The thugs who, after they knocked down a 75 year old man, (in chemo fighting cancer) j walked right by him, shaking their head like he was a piece of garbage - you know like how they treat most black people. You can see when he lost consciousness when his cell phone fell out of his hand and blood was forming a pool under his head.


AnewWoman 61F  
165 posts
6/8/2020 10:18 am

You need to be careful not to paint all cops with the same brush. Yes there are too many cases of bad cops as you pointed out, but let's not let the few bad ones discredit those who are respectful and there to serve and protect the public. Yes the bad ones need to be pointed out and dealt with to discourage others from crossing the line. We want cops to be respectful of those they encounter, maybe a good place to start would be by reciprocating being respectful of the police.


rick315875 62M
10351 posts
6/8/2020 9:05 am

    Quoting lindoboy100:
    Excellent post Rick. It's gratifying to see that this brutality which has been prevalent in law enforcement agencies for as long as I can ever remember is at last being exposed. It's notable that the level of brutality is increasing in populist regimes. But change is coming.......
Thank you. Even amidst the protests against police brutality there is police brutality.


lindoboy100 57M
21554 posts
6/8/2020 7:22 am

Excellent post Rick. It's gratifying to see that this brutality which has been prevalent in law enforcement agencies for as long as I can ever remember is at last being exposed. It's notable that the level of brutality is increasing in populist regimes. But change is coming.......

Pull ma finger.........


rick315875 62M
10351 posts
6/8/2020 5:18 am

Martin Gugino, a 75-year-old protester, lays on the ground after he was shoved by two police officers in Buffalo, New York.

An encounter in Buffalo last Thursday — in which two police officers shoved a 75-year-old man to the ground and left lying him there while blood poured out of his ear — was troubling partly because of the original police account.

The account claimed that the man “was injured when he tripped and fell.” If a video hadn’t existed, the truth might never have come out.

That’s a widespread problem:

In Philadelphia last week, the police said that a man had pushed an officer off his bike; a video instead showed an officer striking the man with a baton.

In a suburb of Sacramento in April, a police officer punched a 14-year-old boy multiple times while arresting him; the officer’s report didn’t mention the punches.

The Minneapolis police’s account of George Floyd’s death initially left out the most important details, like the knee pressed on his neck for almost nine minutes.

Philip Stinson, a criminologist at Bowling Green State University, who has analyzed thousands of police reports, told CNN that lies like these were fairly common.

Activists in the current protest movement have begun to focus on how they can turn the rallies of the past 10 days into lasting change, to reduce both racism and police brutality. And reducing the frequency of false reports by the police is likely to be a key issue.

Already, reform-minded prosecutors and police chiefs have taken some steps in the last few years. The top prosecutor in St. Louis, Kim Gardner, has stopped accepting new cases or search warrant requests from officers with a history of misconduct or lies. In Philadelphia and Seattle, prosecutors are creating similar “do not call” lists, The Marshall Project has reported.

Chris Magnus, the police chief in Tucson, Ariz., told the Marshall Project: “If I had my way, officers who lie wouldn’t just be put on a list, they’d be fired, and also not allowed to work in any other jurisdiction as a police officer ever again.” Often, though, police-union contracts prevent firing even officers with a record of brutality and dishonesty — which then casts a shadow over the many police officers who tell the truth.

(The Times published an investigation this weekend, explaining how police unions have amassed political power and blocked change.)

False police reports are not a new problem. What’s new are the videos that have caused people to realize how common they are. “When I was a reporter, it was the police officer’s word against the victim’s or suspect’s,” Jamie Stockwell, a deputy national editor at The Times, told me. “Cellphone video has changed the debate over policing.”

Source: The New York Times


Become a member to create a blog